MP says ZIMRA boss earns U$310 000 a month


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The member of Parliament for Mbizo Settlement Chikwinya said on Thursday that the Zimbabwe Revenue Authority boss Gershom Pasi earned $310 000 a month, more than what Cuthbert Dube and Happison Muchechetere combined earned.

Chikwinya was seconding the motion calling for better governance moved by Kambuzuma colleague Willias Madzimure. He said they had to drag the motion through with the help of Speaker Jacob Mudenda because the Clerk of Parliament, Austin Zvoma, did not want it to be tabled.

The legislator said he wanted to know how much Zvoma earned because it seemed he too had something to hide.

Chikwinya said the case of Pasi should be brought before the relevant Parliamentary Committee so that he could have the right to answer.

ZIMRA falls under the Ministry of Finance and is in charge of collecting government revenue.

Muchechetere and Dube have been at the forefront of what has now been dubbed salarygate.

Muchechetere made headlines last year when Information Minister Jonathan Moyo and his deputy Supa Mandiwanzira suspended him and the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation board, chaired by Dube, for failing to come up with a turn-around strategy for the national broadcaster.

It was later disclosed that Muchechetere earned close to US$40 000 a month when ZBC employees had gone for almost a year without salaries.

Muchechetere’s salary was dwarfed buy that of Dube when it was disclosed this year that he earned US$230 000 a month while his Premier Service Medical Aid Society had failed to pay a debt of US$38 million. Reports later said Dube earned double this with allowances.

(10 VIEWS)

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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