Mnangagwa says Zimbabwe will prosper despite sanctions


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Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa today said his country will prosper despite sanctions imposed by the West because it has vast natural resources and the brains to develop the country.

Writing in his weekly column in the Sunday Mail, Mnangagwa said history had shown over the years that hardships and limitations, whether natural or man-made, often beget great civilisations and lasting gains.

Challenges triggered creativity in people.

“It is such hurdles — natural or man-made — which ultimately define our achievements and greatness as a nation,” he said.

“While we continue to challenge those nations which decided to impose and punish us with spiteful, illegal sanctions, we must, in equal if not greater measure, seek creative ways around those sanctions, so we prosper our nation in spite of them.

“We cannot wring our hands in despair; or break down and cry. We meet challenges head-on.

“We have God-given resources in abundance; we have the brains which we continue to develop and sharpen; indeed, we have the zeal and will to work and prosper our nation.

“All those attributes are encapsulated in our ageless mantra: NYIKA INOVAKWA NEVENE VAYO!

“It is a mantra we temper with patience, perseverance and persistence we summon and cultivate as a people.

“For steadily, slowly but surely, we will build our country, brick by brick, stone upon stone!”

Zimbabwe has been under sanctions for the past 20 years. 

Although the European Union has removed most of the sanctions, the United States maintains its sanctions on Harare  and insists that they are targetted at named individuals and firms.

The United Nations, however, says the sanctions are hurting ordinary Zimbabweans, especially the poor,  and are stifling investment and the development of the country.

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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