Jonathan Moyo now says Mnangagwa can get as much as 60 percent of the vote


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Exiled former Higher Education Minister Jonathan Moyo who was at the forefront of pushing for Movement for Democratic Change Alliance leader, Nelson Chamisa, to win this year’s presidential vote, now says Emmerson Mnangagwa of the Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front can win as much as 60 percent due to what he claims is massive rigging.

He also claimed that the Chinese embassy in Harare was already celebrating Mnangagwa’s victory yesterday.

“Yesterday morning, as MID cooked up presidential results to steal #chamisa’s emphatic victory, @ZECzim Chigumba told some journalists & diplomats Mnangagwa “would get 53%”. In the evening this was upped to 60%, as per what @qmoyo2000 told some journalists. Brazen MID theft!” he tweeted.

“The Chinese Embassy in Harare held a party yesterday to celebrate “Mnangagwa’s victory”, before @ZECzim had announced any result but after #ZEC had primed some journalists & diplomats on the “outcome” of the cooking of results that was going on behind the scenes. #TheV11Scandal!”he went on.

ZANU-PF already has 52 percent of the seats in the national assembly.

The National Patriotic Front which Moyo and former G40 members of ZANU-PF promoted to unseat the “junta” has so far won only one seat.

The social media has been accused of misleading the Zimbabwe electorate by publishing results that are contrary to those now being released by the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission stocking fears that this could spark violence.

Home Affairs Ministers Obert Mpofu has warned perpetrators of violence that they will face the full wrath of the law.

 

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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