If corruption in Zimbabwe were a person it would be an ugogo with grandchildren now


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Corruption in Zimbabwe has become so rampant that if it were a person it would be an ugogo or  a sekuru with grandchildren, Thokozani Khupe told Parliament this week.

She said this in her contribution to the State of the Nation Address in which she showered President Emmerson Mnangagwa with praise but added that while Mnangagwa was doing an excellent job to improve the lives of Zimbabwe corruption was getting out of hand.

“It looks like instead of corruption being reduced, it is actually becoming a nation on its own. If it was a person, we would say corruption is now ugogo, mbuya or sekuru. It now has grandchildren and great grandchildren,” she said.

“It is still giving birth to some siblings and if we allow it to go on like that, it will not end. The only challenge which I can see, that is according to me, is that when Government takes action and arrests people who are corrupt, there is an outcry of people saying there is abuse of people by police and that people are being arrested without any case.

“If you do not arrest those people and you do not take them to book, people start crying again saying Government is neglecting and it is allowing people to do their own.

“So whatever the Government of Zimbabwe does, nobody accepts that it is doing anything right. It is blamed everywhere and I think His Excellency and his Cabinet should be bold enough to deal with issues and be frank with everybody that we are not going to relent. A crime should be taken to court, people should be arrested and it does not matter what type of a person he is.”

(71 VIEWS)

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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