Zimbabwe more corrupt than Nigeria


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corruption

Though there is s a popular belief that Nigerians are spoiling things in Southern Africa, including in Zimbabwe, because of their high level of corruption, Zimbabwe is actually more corrupt than Nigeria.

British Prime Minister David Cameron said recently that Nigeria and Afghanistan were possibly two of the most corrupt countries in the world, but according to the Corruption Percent Index compiled by Transparency International, Nigeria is not even among the top 10 most countries in the world.

According to the 2015 index, the top 10 most corrupt countries in the world are:

 

  1. North Korea and Somalia – tied at 8 points
  2. Afghanistan – 11 points
  3. Sudan -12 points
  4. Angola and South Sudan – tied at  15 points
  5. Iraq and Libya – tied at 16 points
  6. Haiti, Guinea-Bissau and Venezuela – tied at 17 points
  7. Eritrea, Syria, Turkmenistan and Yemen – tied at 18 points
  8. Uzbekistan- 19 points
  9. Burundi, Cambodia and Zimbabwe – tied at 21 points
  10. Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Myanmar – tied at 22 points

The index is on a scale from 0 to 100 with those with the lowest figure being the most corrupt. Denmark with a score of 91 was the least corrupt country.

Nigeria was at 26 points and ranked 136 out of 167.

 

Related stories:

80 percent of Zimbabweans say government has failed to fight corruption

Corruption caused by ministers staying in office too long- MP

Zimbabwe should declare corruption a catastrophic disaster- MP

MP says it is difficult to curb corruption because it has been politicised

MP says we need another “Sandura Commission” to curb corruption

 

(491 VIEWS)

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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