What Zimbabwe legislators said about traditional medicine- Tapera  Saizi


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HON. SAIZI:  Thank you Madam Speaker, for giving me the opportunity to add my voice to this discussion which is a motion which was put forward by Hon. Masango.  Madam Speaker, it became apparent that there was no harmony between the Ministry of Health and Child Care and ZINATA, but what surprised me today is that the consensus that is in this House has never happened where you find Hon. Members agreeing upon a topic like this.

It pains to experience different ailments.  We know that there are ailments like cancer which do not have a cure but this is because we do not appreciate our indigenous knowledge systems.  Research has not been done to see whether there is a way of addressing such illnesses.  The problem, Madam Speaker, is that sometimes for those who go to work you will discover they expect everyone to have five O’levels.  No one considers Shona but Shona is the language that is our mother tongue and you will discover that most people who use allopathic medicines are people who can communicate using the local language.  So I believe that there is need for funding of a research institute, of research programmes aimed at investigating the efficacy of indigenous knowledge systems, particularly traditional medicines so that we have vaccines and medicines to treat different ailments.

Madam Speaker, I am surprised that in the past, herbs were being used.  At times people were taking tea or herbs in their tea and they were healthy.  This is quite an important discussion which will culminate in us using herbs and allopathic medicines.  I thank you.

 

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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