What is Chamisa’s lawyer up to?


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Citizens Coalition for Change leader Nelson Chamisa’s lawyer, Thabani Mpofu, has been posting riddles on his twitter handle over the past two days leaving followers and party supporters puzzled about what he is implying.

Mpofu who defended Chamisa in his 2018 challenge of the election results at the Constitutional Court and lost, today tweeted: “A good lawyer knows when to be stupid. A brilliant lawyer actually becomes stupid for the good of his client. The legend just does not care. Which type do you want to see turn up Zimbabwe?”

It was not clear whether he was implying that he would defend Chamisa in this year’s election challenge even if Chamisa has no case for the good of his client.

Chamisa has not indicated yet whether he is going to court.

One of the followers, however, said Mpofu should not defend Chamisa this time, “unodyisa, tirikuda Biti”.

Biti was sidelined by Chamisa in the elections with his constituency being passed on to Allan Markham.

He would fit perfectly as a brilliant lawyer if he represents Chamisa.

Yesterday Mpofu tweeted: “You have $100 in $1 notes, a thief snatches $63 and you fight hard to keep the $37; do you hand over the $37 to them in order to make the point that you have been stolen from or you keep the $37 and still try to fight for your $63?”

Most people read this to mean that Chamisa should not throw away the seats the party won but should contest the presidential result.

Chamisa, it seems, is prepared to throw away everything if Ostallos Siziba represented his views when he announced that the party was calling for fresh elections.

 

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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