Supreme Court nullifies section of AIPPA


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The Supreme Court said section 80 of the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act which made the publication of “falsehoods” a criminal offence was unconstitutional.

Information Minister Jonathan Moyo said he would revise the section.

 

Full cable:

 

Viewing cable 03HARARE891, SUPREME COURT RULES AGAINST PART OF MEDIA

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Reference ID

Created

Released

Classification

Origin

03HARARE891

2003-05-08 14:33

2011-08-30 01:44

UNCLASSIFIED

Embassy Harare

This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.

UNCLAS HARARE 000891

 

SIPDIS

 

DEPT FOR AF/PDPA FOR DALTON, MITCHELL AND SIMS

NSC FOR JENDAYI FRAZER

LONDON FOR GURNEY

PARIS FOR NEARY

NAIROBI FOR PFLAUMER

 

E.O. 12958: N/A

TAGS: PREL KPAO ZI

SUBJECT: SUPREME COURT RULES AGAINST PART OF MEDIA

CONTROL LAW

 

1.   On May 8 the Zimbabwe Supreme Court ruled that

Section 80 of the controversial Access to Information

and Protection of Privacy Act (AIPPA) is

unconstitutional and invalidated that section of the

Act. Section 80 made the publication of a

“falsehoods” a criminal offense. In testimony before

the ruling, the government’s lawyer conceded that

Section 80 was vaguely worded and could be interpreted

so broadly that it would conflict with

constitutionally guaranteed freedom of expression.

 

2.   Information Minister Jonathan Moyo has stated

that he will present a revised Section 80 to

Parliament for passage and enactment.

SULLIVAN

(21 VIEWS)

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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