Kasukuwere says ZANU-PF is a mean political machine


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Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front national political commissar Saviour Kasukuwere yesterday said the party was a mean political machine which had survived defections from people like Edgar Tekere, Margret Dongo, Simba Makoni and Dumiso Dabengwa.

Those who wanted to form another party because they were not happy with the results of last year’s congress should go ahead instead of causing confusion, he was reported by The Herald as saying.

“To those who are said to be planning to form their party like Cde Mutasa they should go ahead, but I cannot follow him . . . going where? To go for diesel here in Chinhoyi. We don’t want it. People should not be led astray,” Kasukuwere told provincial leaders from Mashonaland West.

He was referring to an incident in which former party secretary for Administration Didymus Mutasa was duped by a traditional healer who claimed she had discovered diesel in Chinhoyi.

“We cannot have people disturbing the progress of the party because they have ulterior motives. You can go ahead and form your own party instead of trying to cause confusion.”

Mutasa is lobbying for the nullification of the congress and claims to be still the secretary for administration for ZANU-PF. His colleagues are, however, reported to have distanced themselves from him.

Mutasa was taken to the cleaners by Japanese writer and researcher Ken Yamamoto who described him as a moron with an overinflated ego.

Yamamoto felt no pity for Mutasa because he was now tasting his own medicine and cited several incidents of abuse of power and corruption committed by Mutasa.

(140 VIEWS)

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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