Isn’t it blasphemy to compare Joana Mamombe with Mbuya Nehanda?


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Pedzisayi Ruhanya, who was the director of the Zimbabwe Democracy Institute, says Harare West Member of Parliament Joana Mamombe could possibly be the first woman in contemporary politics to be charged with treason after Mbuya Nehanda.

“After the hanging of Nehanda on treason charges by Rhodes’ Pioneer Column, Harare West MP Joana Ruvimbo Mamombe could possibly be the first woman in contemporary politics to be charged with treason! Regime breaking history for autocratic reasons, what a bogus and dubious regime!” he tweeted.

Isn’t this blasphemy to compare Mamombe with Mbuya Nehanda?

Wikipedia says “blasphemy is the act of insulting or showing contempt or lack of reverence to a deity, or sacred objects, or toward something considered sacred or inviolable.”

It says “in law, treason is criminal disloyalty to the state. It is a crime that covers some of the more extreme acts against one’s nation or sovereign. This usually includes things such as participating in a war against one’s native country, attempting to overthrow its government, spying on its military, its diplomats, or its secret services for a hostile and foreign power, or attempting to kill its head of state. A person who commits treason is known in law as a traitor.”

Mbuya Nehanda was one of the inspirations behind the first Chimurenga which resisted white rule in the 1890s and she was hanged for this?

Mamombe is facing charges of trying to subvert the government of President Emmerson Mnangagwa. She was remanded to 19 March.

Can one honestly compare Mamombe with Mbuya Nehanda?

(233 VIEWS)

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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