Cuthbert Dube says he is still PSMAS boss and is owed him US$700 000 in outstanding salary


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The circus about former Premier Services Medical Aid Society chief executive officer, Cuthbert Dube continues. Dube who was “dismissed” after revelations that he was earning over US$500 000 a month says he is still employed by the society and is owed US$700 000 in outstanding salaries. His lawyer Jonathan Samkange told The Herald that the PSMAS board had not terminated Dube’s job but had only told him that he was going on leave but had told him this would be unpaid leave. “The board, under pressure, asked him to go on leave pending some resolution to be made by the board. The next thing they told him that his salary had been reduced to US$43 000 but they stopped paying him that US$43 000. That is the reason we wrote to them reminding them but they told us that they were waiting for the board. But our argument is that if you have the power to stop the salary then you should also have the power to pay.” PSMAS acting board chairperson Gibson Mhlanga disputed the claims saying Dube’s contract was terminated by the previous board. “He was actually given an exit package and he took some of the money. That is why some of us say it doesn’t make sense that now he says he is still employed by PSMAS. He has no role in both PSMAS and PSMI because he was group CEO which means that covers everything under PSMAS. That is the contract that was terminated. In any case that is what they are contesting at the court and we have also submitted our response. We will let the justice system take its course because we don’t want to keep arguing with him,” Mhlanga said.

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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