Chamisa is right for a change


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Movement for Democratic Change leader Nelson Chamisa has been making a lot of reckless pronouncements over the past few weeks which, in my opinion, shows that we are indeed under a new dispensation.

I was watching the video of the MDC’s 19th anniversary celebrations and listening to what speaker after speaker said, I realised that Zimbabwe was really under a new dispensation because under President Robert Mugabe most of them would not have gone to Sunday church services like Chamisa did.

I am talking about the freedom of speech that the speakers exercised.

Of course everyone talked about winning the 30 July elections. I totally disagree in the absence of proof. But more importantly, if you go to court, you must respect the judiciary, more so when you have a dozen or more lawyers as senior members of the party.

However, I totally agree with Chamisa when he says the President must not be the chancellor of any university. Universities must be autonomous.

I think President Emmerson Mnangagwa must take heed of this if he is a listening President as he says.

In the first place, what is really the reason? This was implemented when the country had only one university, now almost every province has a State university, in some cases, two.

Let us not put our academic institutions under undue pressure.

Right now Levi Nyagura is being accused of granting former first Lady Grace Mugabe a doctorate?

With her husband as President of the country and chancellor of the university, who really would have denied her the degree?

Most people would say they would, but let us be honest and practical.

 

(1408 VIEWS)

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Charles Rukuni
The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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